Booz Allen is paid handsomely to spy on us for the government

As you pave the way for the light to descend…remember the wolves in sheep’s clothing. Remember those who control the purse-strings in the international banks, in the international economy who are pursuing a one-world government by the backdoor and by the left-handed path. These are they who are working diligently night and day to unite the world under the Luciferians. -Godfre: 12-28-1973 at Mexico City via Messenger of the Brotherhood Elizabeth Clare Prophet
……………………………………………

The people can fight Big Finance. The people can fight Big Tech. Could the people fight them if they’re all working together with secret law on their side? Booz Allen Hamilton is paid handsomely to spy on us for the government, then pours campaign contributions back into that same government, protecting their powerful financial incentive to have the surveillance state expand, something that is already a bipartisan cause….

Has the Obama Administration permitted the input of “an alert and knowledgeable citizenry” on these matters? Or has the swollen weight of the surveillance state been thrust on our chests before we quite understood what had been created?  http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2013/07/the-nsa-wants-americas-most-powerful-corporations-dependent-on-it/277822/

…………………………………………………………………..

To some of (NSA chief) Alexander’s most vociferous critics, Snowden’s disclosures confirm their image of an agency and a director so enamored of technological prowess that they have sacrificed privacy rights.

“He is absolutely obsessed and completely driven to take it all, whenever possible,” said Thomas Drake, a former NSA official and whistleblower. The continuation of Alexander’s policies, Drake said, would result in the “complete evisceration of our civil liberties.”

Alexander frequently points out that collection programs are subject to oversight by Congress as well as the U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, although the proceedings of both bodies are shrouded in secrecy. But even his defenders say Alexander’s aggressiveness has sometimes taken him to the outer edge of his legal authority.

Some in Congress complain that Alexander’s NSA is sometimes slow to inform the oversight committees of problems, particularly when the agency’s eavesdroppers inadvertently pick up communications that fall outside the NSA’s legal mandates….

“He is the only man in the land that can promote a problem by virtue of his intelligence hat and then promote a solution by virtue of his military hat,” said one former Pentagon official, voicing a concern that the lines governing the two authorities are not clearly demarcated and that Alexander can evade effective public oversight as a result. The former official spoke on the condition of anonymity to be able to talk freely….

(Alexander in summer 2012 at Las Vegas) told the crowd that “the story that we [at the NSA] have millions or hundreds of millions of dossiers on people is absolutely false.”  That line irked lawmakers who were aware of the NSA’s secret collection of phone data. And this year, after Snowden’s revelations, Def Con organizers said federal officials were not welcome at the event….

At a private meeting with financial industry officials a few years ago, Alexander spoke about the proliferation of computer malware aimed at siphoning data from networks, including those of banks. The meeting was described by a participant who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the discussion was off the record.

His proposed solution: Private companies should give the government access to their networks so it could screen out the harmful software. The NSA chief was offering to serve as an all-knowing virus-protection service, but at the cost, industry officials felt, of an unprecedented intrusion into the financial institutions’ databases.

The group of financial industry officials, sitting around a table at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, were stunned, immediately grasping the privacy implications of what Alexander was politely but urgently suggesting. As a group, they demurred.   http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/for-nsa-chief-terrorist-threat-drives-passion-to-collect-it-all/2013/07/14/3d26ef80-ea49-11e2-a301-ea5a8116d211_print.html

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

In 2003, NSA chief Keith Alexander was named deputy chief of staff for intelligence for the U.S. Army. Under his command were the units responsible for Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse in BaghdadIraq.

On July 9, 2012, when asked by a member of the press if a large data center in Utah was used to store data on American citizens, Alexander stated, “No. While I can’t go into all the details on the Utah data center, we don’t hold data on U.S. citizens.”[12]

 

In March 2012, in response to questions during a U.S. congressional hearing from Representative Hank Johnson about allegations made by former NSA officials that the NSA engages in collection of voice and digital information of U.S. citizens Alexander was asked in a number of ways, and replied that, despite the allegations of “James Bashford” [sic] in Wired, the NSA does not collect that data.[13]

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Alexander denied, in carefully parsed words, that the NSA has the power to monitor Americans’ communications without getting a court warrant.

But Alexander’s comments fly in the face of people who actually helped create the agency’s eavesdropping and data mining infrastructure. Few people know that system as well as William Binney, who served as the technical director for the agency’s M Group, which stood for World Geopolitical Military Analysis and Reporting, the giant 6,000-person organization responsible for eavesdropping on most of the world.

He was also the founder and co-director of the agency’s Signals Intelligence Automation Research Center, which helped automate that eavesdropping network. Binney decided to leave after a long career rather than be involved in the agency warrantless eavesdropping program, a program he said involves secret monitoring facilities in ten to twenty large telecom switches around the country, such as the one discovered in San Francisco’s AT&T installation a few years ago.

Historically, the NSA’s initial response has always been to either deny or evade when confronted with issues involving eavesdropping on Americans. For decades the agency secretly hid from Congress the fact that it was copying, without a warrant, virtually every telegram traveling through the United States, a program known as Project Shamrock. Then it hid from Congress the fact that it was illegally targeting the phone calls of anti-war protesters during the Vietnam War, known as Project Minaret.

More recently, President Bush said falsely that no American had been wiretapped without a warrant at the same time the agency was eavesdropping on thousands of Americans without a warrant as part of the later revealed Operation Stellar Wind. The Congress then passed a bill granting immunity from prosecution and law suits to the telecom companies involved in the illegal program.

Also, in the same way that General Alexander carefully parsed his words, the agency has always maintained its own secret definition of words in a document known as United States Signals Intelligence Directive 18, a document classified above top secret.

For example, NSA can intercept millions of domestic communications and store them in a data center like Bluffdale and still be able to say it has not “intercepted” any domestic communications. This is because of its definition of the word. “Intercept,” in NSA’s lexicon, only takes place when the communications are “processed” “into an intelligible form intended for human inspection,” not as they pass through NSA listening posts and transferred to data warehouses.  http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/03/nsa-whistleblower/

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

It’s an age in which even the limited rules in place can be broken with impunity by the powerful – even as journalists and activists who cross them are targeted for destruction by state-corporate alliances armed with increasingly sophisticated cyber weapons, propaganda techniques and surveillance authority. This is the world we accept if we continue to avert our eyes. And it promises to get much worse.  http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jul/01/cyber-intelligence-complex-useful-idiots

……………………………………………………………………………………..

For a taste of what that kind of institutionalized corruption looks like, peruse InfluenceExplorer.com to see how much Booz Allen Hamilton and its parent company, The Carlyle Group, spend. As you’ll see, from Barack Obama to John McCain, many of the politicians now publicly defending the surveillance state have taken huge sums of money from the firms.

These are just examples from two companies among scores, but they exemplify a larger dynamic. Simply put, there are huge corporate forces with a vested financial interest in making sure the debate over security is tilted toward the surveillance state and against critics of that surveillance state. In practice, that means when those corporations spend big money on campaign contributions, they aren’t just buying votes for specific contracts. They are also implicitly pressuring politicians to rhetorically push the discourse in a pro-surveillance, anti-civil liberties direction.http://www.sunjournal.com/news/columns-analysis/2013/07/16/david-sirota-how-cash-secretly-rules-surveillance/1392360

…………………………………………………………………………………

7-16-13

Barrett Brown is a journalist imprisoned without bail (in Texas by FBI), facing over 100 years of potential jail time, much of it for posting an http link to a public forum. He had been writing about several private intelligence companies and set up a Wikipedia-like site, ProjectPM, for crowdsourced analysis of the documents released by Anonymous after several hacking attacks. Some people are petitioning for Brown’s freedom from what they view as a politically targeted prosecution   http://www.policymic.com/articles/54531/meet-the-journalist-who-connects-the-dots-between-wikileaks-edward-snowden-and-the-nsa

Project PM is a crowdsourced investigation focused on research and analysis. If you care that the surveillance state is expanding in capabilities and intent without being effectively opposed by the population of the West, you can assist in making this an actionable resource for journalists, activists, and other interested parties.  http://wiki.project-pm.org/wiki/Main_Page

………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Shadow Intelligence Agency–Booz Allen

3-11-08

Deepening the corporate alliance with the Bush administration and its war on terror also had significant advantages for Booz Allen and its fellow corporations: on one hand, it drastically increased their contracts with military and intelligence agencies; and on the other, homeland security provided a convenient excuse for reducing government oversight and regulation. These dual interests were spelled out in unusual detail in 2004 by Richard Wilhelm, a former CIA and NSA officer who once served as national security adviser to former Vice President Al Gore and now leads Booz Allen’s business with the CIA and the Office of the DNI. 

Speaking to a conference on information-sharing and counterterrorism, Wilhelm explained that the “right mix of policies” for business should include a wide range of “incentives” and “cooperative arrangements,” including “appropriate protections from Freedom of Information Act requirements and other unintended consequences of more open information sharing.” Government, he argued, should “help make the business case, and then sweeten it – because industry will share information when there is a business case to do so.” In other words, corporations were happy to participate in the exchange of information about terrorism and other security threats, but only if there were enough rewards….

So far, however, no reports of conflicts of interest have emerged from Congress, which in any case exercises little oversight over intelligence contracts….In an interview with CorpWatch, Stephen Lerner, the director of SEIU’s Private Equity Project, said the union launched this nationalist campaign out of concern that classified information from Booz Allen could leak into the hands of the Abu Dhabi fund, thus compromising U.S. security interests.

“When you combine buyout firms, which have much less reporting requirements because they are private, with opaque sovereign wealth funds, you get a toxic stew of secrecy,” he said. Asked how or why Booz Allen executives might leak classified information to a foreign government, he replied: “The point is, you have no way of knowing if they would or wouldn’t.” He added that, while the SEIU has not taken a position on Booz Allen’s extensive role in intelligence outsourcing, the issue of “government jobs being done by private contractors” might emerge in the future for the union. …

Booz Allen prides itself on the long-term personal relationships it has forged between its personnel and their government clients. “We stay for a lifetime,” Mark J. Gerencser, the senior vice president in charge of Booz Allen’s government contracting division, remarked in 2006. A quick study of their biographies posted on Booz Allen’s Website suggests that this is indeed true – the senior management have shuttled back and forth between the company and the government for their entire lives. 

As the director of Booz Allen’s U.S. government business, for example, Gerencser serves in “several broad-based roles,” including “representing industry” to the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Joint Chiefs of Staff, which manage the Pentagon’s vast intelligence operations. He is also a member of Booz Allen’s leadership team that sets the strategic direction of the company, and has run many of the war games staged by Booz Allen for its government clients. 

http://www.zcommunications.org/carlyle-group-may-buy-major-cia-contractor-booz-allen-hamilton-by-tim-shorrock

…………………………………………………………………………………………

7-2-13  The Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, has the audacity to tell NBC News, “It is literally gut-wrenching to see” Snowden’s revelations… because of the “damage” they do to “our intelligence capabilities”! As though there were really an “our” or “us” at this point. As though we were a nation united, including the mindful watchers and the grateful watched.

No, there are us, and there are them. The tiny power elite that controls the mainstream press and cable channels, the corporations that dutifully hand over meta-data to the state (and then deny doing so to allay consumer outrage), the twin political parties, are sick to their stomachs that they’ve been so exposed.

http://www.zcommunications.org/why-the-ruling-class-is-so-upset-about-edward-snowden-by-gary-leupp

…………………………………………………………………………

7-17-13  In this way, the Obama administration has more than doubled the total whistleblower prosecutions of all previous administrations combined under the draconian World War I-era Espionage Act….In addition, it has threatened journalists who have written on or published leaked material and gone on expeditions into the telephone and email records of major media organizations.  http://www.zcommunications.org/how-to-be-a-rogue-superpower-by-tom-engelhardt

…………………………………………………………………………………….

10-10-08

During the 109th Congress, Senator Specter chaired a hearing at which General Alexander testified that “at all times, NSA applies procedures approved by the U.S. Attorney General to all aspects of its activities, seeking through these procedures to minimize the acquisition, retention and dissemination of information concerning U.S. persons.” At the same hearing, in response to questions from Senators Leahy and Cornyn, government witnesses denied that the personal communications of U.S. soldiers in Iraq were being targeted for collection. Similarly, during the 110th Congress, Senator Leahy chaired a hearing at which Director McConnell reassured Judiciary Committee members that “the minimization procedures that Intelligence Community agencies follow are Attorney General approved guidelines issued pursuant to Executive Order 12333. These minimization procedures apply to the acquisition, retention and dissemination of U.S. person information.”

The FISA Amendments Act of 2008 included new protections for U.S. persons abroad—including a requirement for FISA court approval of surveillance, based on a showing of probable cause—but such provisions are for naught if they are not followed. Over a year ago, Senator Leahy referred Ms. Kinne’s allegations to the Department of Defense Inspector General, who then referred the matter to the National Security Agency’s Inspector General. In light of Mr. Faulk’s reinforcement of Ms. Kinne’s charges, we specifically request the following from each of you: (1) a vigorous investigation of Ms. Kinne’s and Mr. Faulk’s allegations; (2) a delineation of what steps, if any, you have taken to detect, deter and punish any violations of law or regulation that are found to have occurred; (3) written assurances that any ill-gotten collection is being destroyed and purged from government databases; and (4) an agreement to provide the Senate Judiciary Committee with any audits or reports resulting from these revelations, with appropriate safeguards for classified content.

As the Senate Committee principally charged with protecting Americans’ constitutional liberties and ensuring the privacy of U.S. persons’ communications, we believe the foregoing requests are sound and reasonable, and we look forward to your timely reply.

 

Sincerely,  Patrick Leahy Arlen Specter, Chairman Ranking Member

cc: The Hon. Michael Mukasey, Attorney General
The Hon. Michael V. Hayden, Director, CIA

Source: http://leahy.senate.gov/press/200810/101008a.html

…………………………………………………………………………………..

5-2-07  Senate Intelligence Committee members said the Bush administration must provide more information about its earlier domestic spying before it can hope to gain additional powers for the future.

“Is the administration’s proposal necessary, or does it take a step further down a path that we will regret as a nation?” asked Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-V.Wa., as he convened a rare public hearing of the Senate Intelligence Committee he chairs.

For two hours, National Intelligence Director Mike McConnell, National Security Agency Director Lt. Gen. Keith Alexander, Assistant Attorney General Kenneth Wainstein and their lawyers tried to parry increasingly dubious and hostile questions. They deferred many answers to a committee session closed to the public.

With little apparent success, they portrayed the administration bill as merely an adjustment to technological changes wrought by cell phones, e-mail and the Internet since the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act was enacted in the 1970s. Under current rules, McConnell said, “We’re actually missing a significant portion of what we should be getting.”

 

But Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., responded, “We look through the lens of the past to judge how much we can trust you.” Like other senators, he said that trust was undermined by recent disclosure that the FBI had abused so-called National Security Letters to obtain information about Americans.  http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/washington/2007-05-01-2241789377_x.htm

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s