real biography of Francis Bacon

IMG_7694Elizabeth ~1572, by Hilliard
IMG_7693IMG_7692IMG_7691IMG_7690
-Robert Dudley by Hilliard, Elizabeth I by Hilliard, Dudley by Hilliard, all three in 1570s; N. Hilliard by N. Hilliard

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p. 10 of Von Kunow’s 1924 book The Last of the Tutors:
During his confinement in the Tower which was at the same time as the short imprisonment of Princess Elizabeth, Bishop Gardiner of Winchester, a fanatical Catholic and adherent of Queen Mary as her Chancellor of State, reports that a love affair had already sprung up there between Robert and Elizabeth.

A chronicle of the Tower offers the further statement that the couple had been married there by a monk.

The “Dictionary of National Biography” however states that after the execution of the Duke of Northumberland, Guildford Dudley and Lady Jane Grey, the imprisonment of the other Dudley sons was less strict, and that Robert Dudley was allowed to receive his wife Lady Amy.

On Robert Dudley’s liberation he attracted the attention of Philip II of Spain, then in England for his marriage to Queen Mary, and was chosen while Philip was in the Netherlands, as private ambassador between him and the queen. This intimacy explains Leicester’s subsequent appeal to Philip to secure his (Leicester’s) acknowledgment as Prince Consort.
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from Von Kunow, pp. 12-13: The dispatches of the Spanish envoy de Fiera to Philip II give authentic proof of this:

“The prospect of a union of the Queen with the Archduke Karl is entirely miscarried, as the Queen evidently loves Dudley.”

In Jan. 1560 de Fiera’s successor de Quadra, the Spanish envoy, reports from London to Philip that Dudley’s arrogance was continually increasing, and he was looked upon as the future King.

In December 1561 a secret despatch of the Spanish envoy advises that the queen is expecting a child by Dudley.

A book of which more notice will be taken later, entitled “Leicester’s Commonwealth”, “conceived, spoken and published with most earnest protestation of all dutiful goodwill and affection toward this realm”, which first appeared in Antwerp in 1584, enters with still greater completeness and accuracy into these statements. In the “Dictionary of National Biography” the individual statements also agree with those in “Leicester’s Commonwealth.”

It is therein recorded that on Jan. 21, 1561, Queen Elizabeth was secretly married to Robert Dudley in the house of Lord Pembroke before a number of witnesses.

On the next day the birth of Francis, called Bacon, is registered “in London.” Many years later the notice was added: “In York House.”

In the family genealogy of the house of Nicholas Bacon, Francis was, however, not entered. Only the afternote “Born in York House” created the impression that Francis had first seen the light at the official residence of the Lord Keeper.

William Rawley, Bacon’s personal chaplain and amanuensis, in his Life of Sir Francis Bacon, printed in Resuscitatio 1657, “in York House, or York Place, in the Strand.” Rawley must have known that York House was the residence of Sir Nicholas Bacon, while York Place, known also as Whitehall, was the residence of the Queen. This ambiguity, therefore, would appear intentional and is highly significant.

In the same year,–June 24, 1561, is dated another communication of the Spanish envoy de Quadra to Philip II.

I extract the following also from the “Dictionary of National Biography,” XVI 114 (same page) (italics mine):

“Sir Henry Sidney in January 1560-1 first asked de
Quadra whether he would help on the marriage if Dudley
undertook to restore the Roman Catholic religion in Eng-
land. In February Dudley and the Queen both talked with
the Spaniard openly on the subject; in April Dudley ac-
cepted the terms offered by de Quadra. He promises that
England should send representatives to the Council of
Trent, and talked of going himself. On 24 June de Quadra
accompanied Elizabeth and her lover on a water-party
down the Thames, when they behaved with discreditable
freedom. In a long conversation de Quadra undertook to
press on their union on condition that they should acknowl-
edge the papal supremacy. The negotiation was kept secret
from the responsible ministers, but Cecil suspected the
grounds of de Quadra’s intimacy with Dudley and Eliza-
beth, and powerful opposition soon declared itself.”
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from Von Kunow, pp. 15-16:
In Froude’s History of England, VII, p. 308-26, we find that, according to the records of the Simancas Archives, Elizabeth and Leicester considered the announcement of their marriage through Spanish mediation, but that Elizabeth always refused. http://www.sirbacon.org/vonkunow.html
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Von Kunow, p. 19:
After the death of Sir Nicholas Bacon in 1579 Francis was obliged to return to London. Here it is noteworthy that the Lord Keeper left all his children well provided with means and certain landed estates in the counties of Hereford and Middlesex. Anthony inherited Gorhambury, which also remained the dower seat of Lady Ann Bacon.

To Francis the Lord Keeper had bequeathed nothing and, almost without means, he became dependent upon the assistance of his foster-mother and occasional aid from Anthony.
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The magnificent library amassed by Sir Francis Bacon contained the very volumes necessary to supply the quotations and anecdotes incorporated into the Shakespearian plays. Many of the plays, in fact, were taken from plots in earlier writings of which there was no English translation at that time. Because of his scholastic acquirements, Lord Verulam could have read the original books; it is most unlikely that William Shakspere could have done so. http://www.sacred-texts.com/eso/sta/sta41.htm

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